The Triumph of Sisterly Love in Christina Rossetti’s “Goblin Market”

I wrote this summary and analysis of Christina Rossetti’s poem “Goblin Market” to help myself understand the poem better. Poetry isn’t my strong suit, I admit, but hopefully this will be helpful to someone. I was going to teach it at one point, but ultimately decided against it; maybe someday I will change my mind yet again.

Synopsis

Goblin Market by Christina Rossetti Illustrated by Dion Clayton CalthropChristina Rossetti’s poem “Goblin Market” (written in April 1859, published in 1862) opens with lush images of fruit being peddled by anxious goblin salesmen. Two sisters, Laura and Lizzie, appear by the river and Lizzie, afraid of what the the fruits may have been ripened on, covers her eyes, but Laura stares at the goblin men. Laura becomes entranced by the goblins, and Lizzie runs away before the goblins approach Laura.

Even though she wants to buy the goblin fruit, Laura has no money, but they tell her she has “much gold” on her head, and so she exchanges a lock of hair for fruit, which she eats ravenously. In a trance Laura returns home where Lizzie scolds her with the cautionary tale of Jeanie who became addicted to goblin fruit and died when she could not get more. Laura reassures Lizzie that she can always get more goblin fruit and will bring her some tomorrow.

The next morning they do their chores while Laura secretly pines for nightfall so she can return to the market. The sisters go to the river to fetch water and Laura delays them until past sunset; however, Laura can no longer see or hear the goblins, now only Lizzie is able to see them. Laura returns home heart-sick and, while Lizzie sleeps, Laura gnashes her teeth and weeps uncontrollably.

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