Re-ment Kirby’s Cafe Time Set

Re-ment Kirby Cafe Time Set

I have vivid memories from childhood of beating Kirby’s Adventure on the original NES. I was at a sleepover at a friend’s house and her dad had his own console so he could play video game golf, to which I was all, “Sports video games will never be popular,” because I was 12 at the time. I place the memory in childhood, even though I was in middle school at the time, but there was something inherently joyous and innocent about the event. Ever since then, Kirby has had a special place in my heart, so imagine my excitement when a Kirby-themed Re-ment set was announced: Kirby’s Cafe Time!

The release date is December 2017 and there are 8 sets in the series:

1. Welcome to cafe! includes a Kirby figure with a tan hat, a candy stand with Kirby-shaped lollies, and a chalkboard cafe sign that reads “Welcome to Pupupu Cafe!”

2. Honey toast (none of the names thrill after Set 1) comes with presumably a honey toast with a Kirby ice cream scoop on top, a Kirby soda float, and a fork and knife set with holder.

3. Cafe table is aptly named as it comes with an adorable pink Kirby cafe table with a star-shaped base. The set also includes a menu, a Meta Knight cake roll, a 1-up napkin holder, and a second Kirby fork. Odd that the fork is appearing in two sets; why the duplicate?

4. Omelette rice is extremely cute and features a Kirby made of rice sleeping under an omelette blanket with a maximum tomato drawn in katchup. That is next level right there. The set also includes a Kirby shaped cup of coffee, a spoon (completing the silverware set), a bell, and a salad.

5. Hamburger set has a Kirby burger basket with star fries, a mug of root beer, and a tray holding a silver pitcher and jar of star candies that’s being carried by the generic enemy that gives you no superpowers. I cannot remember what they’re called.

6. Sofa is awesome and features a Kracko sofa, which is the cyclops cloud that shoots lightning at you. This set also comes with a book, a coffee cup with Kirby shaped foam, and a tray with a Kirby donut and star cookie sandwich.

7. Pancake includes a star chair that matches the cafe table, an elaborate Kirby ice cream float, another spoon, and a frying pan with individual Kirby pancakes with whipped cream.

8. Coffee features Whispy Woods, a super cute Kirby cupcake, a maximum tomato coffee cup, a coffee pot, and a kettle with a hamster on it that reads “kick” for some reason.

Sets 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8 are all on my wishlist with 6 being my absolute favorite. With that many to love, I may as well order the whole set. The December 2017 release date makes it a pretty sweet holiday gift, too.

Pre-Order

e-Traders Place $40 USD

The 5th Annual Coaster Show at La Luz de Jesus

To be honest, the annual coaster show at La Luz de Jesus gallery caught on in a way I never thought it would. As a collector it seems like it just wouldn’t work: flimsy medium, relatively high price point, coaster stigma (“Look at my sweet art coaster collection” said no one), but I was wrong. The show draws a huge crowd, and it’s a great way to get small pieces from up-and-coming artists.

That being said, the big names are not around anymore because the show has been changing. In short: instead by being by invitation, it’s open submission. However, the big names always sell out opening night anyway (if not before) and all most of us can do it pout about it, so it’s not the end of the world. Here are a few of my favorites from the show. All of the pieces from the 5th Annual Coaster Show can be found online; I assume you email to purchase since there’s no direct checkout option at the moment, and it doesn’t look like there’s going to be.

Warning! If you click through (direct links to art existed briefly, but have been removed), a lot of the coasters are extremely sexual/graphic, which I don’t really want to see (maybe you do, idk), so fair warning.

Jack O' Lantern Demon by Ally Burke

Jack O’Lantern Demon by Ally Burke sold out opening night or before, and I can easily see why. This wonderfully terrifying piece packs a tremendous amount into a 4″ circle, and I am especially enjoying the detailed ghost background. Burke is pretty much the art queen of Halloween though, so no surprise that this piece is awesome.

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Witchcraft: A Very Short Introduction by Malcolm Gaskill

Slang: A Very Short Introduction Witchcraft: A Very Short Introduction by Malcolm Gaskill is the fourth book in the series that I’ve read and the 228th published in the series overall. The series is massive, so I feel like there’s a never-ending stream of interesting books flowing my way. Witchcraft is a particular favorite, and I liked it even more than my most recent read, Slang. The older illustrations that were selected are especially entertaining because they show the way that witches were imagined in the 16th and 17th centuries. Oddly one illustration, Hendy Fuseli’s The Nightmare, is captioned as having a “wild-eyed horse,” but the horse is clearly a ghost. At least to me, but I’m not seeing a second interpretation possible there. Along with illustrations and paintings are photographs, too, including one of a witches’ bottle from 2004 and a really funny one of a medium from 1930 ‘channeling’ a spirit into what looks to be a trash bag with a face drawn on it by a child.

The ‘witch-bottle’ that’s discussed is particularly interesting to me because it was buried upside-down and included nails, pins, hair, fingernail clippings, urine, and a pierced leather heart. The author continues “whether it was intended as protection against witchcraft or the means to reverse a spell, we’ll never know” (34). Why would they never know? Maybe ask a modern witch, you know, one that’s alive. I don’t mean to alarm any muggles out there, but witch bottles are still super common. That it was buried upside down may or may not have been intentional. Pins and nails are common protection items that would be universal to tons of witch bottles in existence today, not just historically, specifically ones to protect a home or person. Further, the nails, hair, and urine obviously belong to a person; it’s likely to belong to one person, and equally likely to belong to the person who created the bottle. Finally, the leather heart is pierced by presumably a pin or nail (why Gaskill doesn’t specify I don’t know, and I wish he had) seems to indicate heartbreak or pain. I posit that the witch bottle discovered was made to protect the creator from the pain of heartbreak, or to break the influence of heartbreak on that person. I suppose it could be to inflict heartbreak on someone else, or give them a heart attack, but they would need to DNA test the bottle. Whose DNA is on it, and is it all the same person? Because that’s actually really important. I don’t know a non-awkward way to explain this so I’ll just say it: I know all this stuff because I’m a witch. A practicing modern witch who picks up rusty nails when she sees them to make, you guessed it, witch bottles.

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