Nendoroid More Halloween Sets: Vampire and Witch

Nendoroid More Halloween Sets: Girl and Boy

Two new Nendoroid More sets are here for Halloween 2017: Vampire (boy) and Witch (girl). Why they’re labeled as a boy and girl set rather than what their costumes are is beyond me, be que sera sera. They are a August 2017 release, and both sets are currently in stock (links below). Nendoroid More is a line of accessories and environments/swag for Nendoroids that are bought separately from the figures. These accessories range from cute (Pikachu case for extra Nendo head) to strange (office clothes bodies and tanks) and are interchangeable with all Nendoroids.

Nendoroid More Halloween Set: Girl Version

The Witch set is up first because it’s my favorite. Witch-themed anything is going to capture my attention, and the idea of being able to dress one of my Nendos up for Halloween is too cute. I hit the pre-order button very quickly on this cutie.

Nendoroid More Halloween Set: Girl Version

The Nendoroid More Witch set comes with a purple and orange plaid base with stand, ghost with stand, witchy girl body, pumpkin pale, witch hat, devil horns, pitchfork, devil tail, and zombie hand. Not shown are stickers of spider webs, fangs, scars, and blood drips that are also included with the set. You can see one of the spider web stickers on the figure above; since they’re single use I don’t see them as much of a selling point, but I won’t complain about them as extras.

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Handmade Halloween 2017: Dead Spider Hands aka Ally Burke

Last year I did a Handmade Halloween post and I really enjoyed it, so I thought I’d do it again this year. This time I’m featuring an artist whose work I’ve been collecting for a few years now and who has a wonderfully creepy vibe: Ally Burke aka Dead Spider Hands.

This spooktacular print of Haunted House ($20) features a sort of Frankenstein’s monster-inspired woman with a ghost filled house in her hair, complete with planchette hair clip. I really enjoy the minimal use of color in this piece, which was from Burke’s Inktober 2016 series. I’m also almost positive that this was inspired by Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, which I just finished reading.

If you’re in the market for original art, Burke has a number of pieces available. Above is Spookyberry Twins ($100) and it’s done in her newer style. Since I’ve collected her work for a few years it’s been really interesting to see how it’s changed, with more detail, color, and shading being added over time. I really like how the black lips are shaded on the left of the two faces.

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The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson was originally published in 1959 before being being turned into two movies and (soon) a Netflix series. After terrorizing students for years with her short story, “The Lottery,” I became intrigued by this novel when a friend read it for a book club. A year later, I’m happy to say that I finished the novel, and in two readings nonetheless. The night I started it, I stopped reading it when I was about 80 pages in because I could tell something terrifying was about to happen, and I didn’t want to be up all night either reading it or worrying about ghosts.

The novel has a relatively small cast of characters: Dr. John Montague, a paranormal scientist; Eleanor Vance (Nell) a shy woman of 32 who has taken care of her mother for the last 11 years; Theodora (Theo) who seems to possess some sort of telepathic or psychic abilities; and Luke Sanderson who is the heir to the house, a charming rake, and whose aunt seems to want to get rid of him. If four people from diverse backgrounds staying overnight in a haunted mansion where terrible events took place seems trite, don’t blame Jackson: she invented these tropes. As much as I hate horror movies, I absolutely love terror in books, and Jackson’s novel is a slow, atmospheric build. Once events start happening you know that it’s already out of control, and many questions remain unanswered at the end of the novel.

The Question of Eleanor and Theodora

One of the main questions that I ended the novel with is about Eleanor and Theodora; are they in love? I talked about “lesbian disruptions” in my The Return of the Soldier writeup, but this is something more. Eleanor is the shy mousy girl in the story, she’s living with her sister, Carrie, and her brother-in-law three months after her mother, who she was forced to take care of, died. She hated her mother, and kind of slept through her mother’s demand for medicine, which may have been what killed her. Oops! At 32 years old we get the impression that she’s never had a boyfriend or relationship of any kind, and that she sees herself as essentially unwanted. She has a wild, immersive imagination that fills the beginning sections of the novel, and she covers up the banality of her own life with pieces of these early daydreams. It’s only at the end of the novel that she reveals that she truly has no place to go home to, and it’s crushing.

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